• Cassaundra Bayot

The Crime of Birth Control



Birth control has long existed in our history with DIY forms, such as cotton linens and makeshift diaphragms. In 1916, Margaret Sanger decided it was time for the first birth control clinic in Brooklyn. She had coined the term “birth control” and started the American Birth Control League. She spent the rest of her years testing different formulas and obtaining regulations from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Her dream was to provide regulated birth control for women in the world to have control over their own bodies.


Throughout the years, new forms of birth control have been released and recalled. It’s safe to say that birth control is constantly researched for improvement and safer use. However, it does not change the fact that there are serious effects that come with taking any form of birth control and it must be researched to know what works best for you and your body.

Let's dive deep into the crime of birth control to unlock the effects it can have, the myths healthcare providers want to debunk, and the aftermath of birth control once you are off of it.

Contraceptives have been proven to work wonders on issues that most females deal with. Heavy and intense periods, acne, and prevention of pregnancy are the top reasons why it’s a great tool to use. Healthcare providers have even prescribed birth control for teenagers as young as 14. As it is known to regulate periods and balance hormones, many young girls will start it as a way to maintain a difficult menstrual cycle.


There are more side effects of birth control than benefits. For birth control pills, the side effects include:

  • Headaches

  • Nausea

  • Upset stomach

  • Sore breasts

  • Change in sexual desire & mood

  • Increase in high blood pressure

Pills are the most common form and most women will start with these. See how we said “start”? Some women have jumped from different forms of contraceptives in order to find the best one suited for her, but in reality, there isn’t one that offers little side effects and relief.


An IUD can cause Pelvic Inflammatory Disease and an increase in ovarian cysts. The rod implant in your arm causes headaches, irregular periods, weight gain, and difficulty removing the rod once you are finished with it. The once a month Depo shot can cause weight gain, change in mood, sore breasts, and with long term use, bone loss. With these kinds of side effects, would you be interested in still taking birth control?


Some studies have shown, such as this one, that these side effects are myths. While there are no direct links to every woman, it does not mean that it isn’t happening at all. Side effects vary from woman to woman, but the main consensus is that birth control isn’t meant to make us feel like we are walking on air. It is a form of synthetic hormones to cover the other issues we have to deal with as a woman. It takes a toll on the body and can lead to issues that many doctors don't want to believe.


If you decide to get off your birth control, there are still long term symptoms that can occur. If you have struggled with intense periods in the past, it’s more than likely that they will come back for you. This goes the same for PMS and headaches. Ovulation has also been controlled when on contraceptives and once off of it, you could feel more pain during your ovulating cycle.

We have been told that birth control is our magic pill, but we do not speak of the cons that come with it. Some of us get on contraceptives at such an early age that we believe our symptoms are okay; that we fail to listen to our own bodies. Every form of birth control is unique for any woman, but it’s up to you to stand up for how it makes you feel. Anything that you put into your body will always affect you, but please do your research! It’s also important to find a doctor that will listen to you when you aren’t feeling well. We would love to hear your experience or thoughts on the topic of contraceptives. Share your ideas with us on Instagram @thisisuproar.

0 views
  • White Facebook Icon
  • White Twitter Icon
  • White Instagram Icon
  • White Pinterest Icon